The Difference between Private and Public Speaking

 

      private

[英]['praɪvət][美][ˈpraɪvɪt] 

adj.私有的,私人的; 秘密的; 内心的; 平民的,无官职的,士兵的; 

n.列兵,士兵

复数:privates 

 

例句:

1. Private offices are an expensive addiction.

    私人办公空间是项花费很高的支出。

2. There's a thing called the private cloud, behind the firewall.

    在防火墙后面还有私有云。

3. Often, this information is private.

    很多时候这些信息是私人的。

4. France welcomes private muslim schools.

    法国欢迎私立的穆斯林学校。

5. The private investigator called herself ruth.

    这个私家侦探名自称露丝。

Conclusion

This lesson goes through the difference in the way we speak normally in conversation as opposed to when we speak in front of an audience. It explains how these two formats differ and how we can start to improve simply by understanding these differences.

The main content

I mentioned that public speaking is different from private speaking

Today we're going to discuss what I mean when I say that

Consider first what happens when a speaker makes a speech

Sometimes you will see the audience begin to drift away

or become sleepy  fall asleep or even just stop paying attention

Now think about conversations that you've had with your friends

When it's one on one  neither of you drift away 

neither of you begin to not pay attention to what the other is saying

And both of you continue to talk in the conversation until it's completed

What's the difference?

You might say length for starters

A speech will be going on for maybe ten  twenty  thirty minutes 

and you'll have to listen to that speech

for however long it's going to be

You might consider the number of people

Within the audience  there could be over a hundred people;

whereas in a conversation  it may only have two people or three people

The audience has so many more people

and you cannot simply talk to each one individually

you have to speak to them as a group

There are certain rules that apply to a conversation

that aid us in this difference

There are social rules that we see

when we're talking about politeness and just the ways the social queues work

For example  we have two speakers  One and Two

When one person begins speaking  he will speak for a length of time 

and then stop

When that person stops  the second speaker will begin to speak as well

and then end when they have finished with what they're speaking about

This continues in a conversation

until it is finished

Taking turns within a conversation is part of being polite 

is part of private speaking 

What it means to speak privately with a friend

This idea of taking turns also allows for the ideas of interruptions

It's impolite for one person to speak while another person is speaking

You have to wait until the end 

Imagine Speaker 1 is speaking  and then in the middle of that 

the second speaker starts to speak about something entirely different

They will feel upset  perhaps 

and angry at the other speaker for treading on their speaking turn

Also  this helps us understand why people in conversations are always paying attention

If the first speaker is speaking  the second speaker is expected to listen

so that they can come in on cue

If they do not do so  what results is an awkward silence

Such an awkward silence  something that we painfully try to avoid

And why silence sometimes in speeches feels awkward as well

Besides coming in at the appropriate time 

the next speaker is always going to try

and speak about something relevant to what the first speaker has said

This is to prove that they were listening

Can you imagine if you were speaking to your mother on the telephone

and after your mother asked you a question 

and you started to talk about something entirely different

They might be offended that you were not listening to them

And as such  there is a threat upon you

to make sure that you are able to prove

that you are listening to what was said

and that you are able to come in on cue

This threat in conversation is something that is different from public speaking

So how exactly is this different from speech?

As I've already said  speeches themselves are very long

usually ten  twenty  thirty minutes  maybe an hour  sometimes two hours

We are simply not used to that length of time  sitting there and listening

We are used to these conversations in which we take turns

in which we have turns that last  maybe only ten  twenty  thirty seconds

Audiences  as a result  are not expected to talk after the speaker has spoken

So that expectation of having to come in on cue 

or to prove that they were listening 

those expectations are not there

In public speaking  audiences can relax

There is no threat  and there is no way of forcing them to listen

One of the other things that can cause audiences to drift away

for them to not pay any more attention

is if they've become confused  they will definitely stop listening 

They can't stop the speech  raise their hand

interrupt the speaker  and ask for clarification

In a conversation  if you don't understand something that someone is saying

you can easily ask for "oh  what did you mean by this?"

That clarification is extremely important in making sure you understand

and then continuing the conversation 

However  in a speech  if someone is listening 

but then they don't understand what you say

they may continue to think about that one moment

And as that time passes 

whether it'd be ten  thirty seconds  or even a minute

When they come back to listening to you 

they would have fallen further behind in your speech 

And as a result 

they won't know where you are or what you're talking about

At that point  people will drift away and stop paying attention

Sometimes  it's the preparation of the presentation itself

that is designed in a way that does not help the audience

Sometimes  the audience is just not interested in the topic

and that could be an issue 

because they can't change the topic like they could in a conversation

So if you look at private speaking in which

there is a constant communication  turns  shorter length

all of these elements make it much much easier

for people in conversations to pay attention

The threat is there  and people respect that threat

The rules of society and politeness demand it

In public speaking  the threat is no longer there

and very often we find

that audiences would easily drift away and stop paying attention

simply because there is no reason 

there is no threat that will stop them from doing so

This is a difference between public and private speaking

and these are just some of the hurdles that we face

when we are trying to keep an audience interested

in what we have to say

Next time we will begin to discuss tools that we can use 

such as eye contact

in order to keep audiences engaged and listening

Thank you  I hope you have enjoyed this lesson 

The Difference between Private and Public Speaking


                    The Difference between Private and Public Speaking

 

      private

[英]['praɪvət][美][ˈpraɪvɪt] 

adj.私有的,私人的; 秘密的; 内心的; 平民的,无官职的,士兵的; 

n.列兵,士兵

复数:privates 

 

例句:

1. Private offices are an expensive addiction.

    私人办公空间是项花费很高的支出。

2. There's a thing called the private cloud, behind the firewall.

    在防火墙后面还有私有云。

3. Often, this information is private.

    很多时候这些信息是私人的。

4. France welcomes private muslim schools.

    法国欢迎私立的穆斯林学校。

5. The private investigator called herself ruth.

    这个私家侦探名自称露丝。

Conclusion

This lesson goes through the difference in the way we speak normally in conversation as opposed to when we speak in front of an audience. It explains how these two formats differ and how we can start to improve simply by understanding these differences.

The main content

I mentioned that public speaking is different from private speaking

Today we're going to discuss what I mean when I say that

Consider first what happens when a speaker makes a speech

Sometimes you will see the audience begin to drift away

or become sleepy  fall asleep or even just stop paying attention

Now think about conversations that you've had with your friends

When it's one on one  neither of you drift away 

neither of you begin to not pay attention to what the other is saying

And both of you continue to talk in the conversation until it's completed

What's the difference?

You might say length for starters

A speech will be going on for maybe ten  twenty  thirty minutes 

and you'll have to listen to that speech

for however long it's going to be

You might consider the number of people

Within the audience  there could be over a hundred people;

whereas in a conversation  it may only have two people or three people

The audience has so many more people

and you cannot simply talk to each one individually

you have to speak to them as a group

There are certain rules that apply to a conversation

that aid us in this difference

There are social rules that we see

when we're talking about politeness and just the ways the social queues work

For example  we have two speakers  One and Two

When one person begins speaking  he will speak for a length of time 

and then stop

When that person stops  the second speaker will begin to speak as well

and then end when they have finished with what they're speaking about

This continues in a conversation

until it is finished

Taking turns within a conversation is part of being polite 

is part of private speaking 

What it means to speak privately with a friend

This idea of taking turns also allows for the ideas of interruptions

It's impolite for one person to speak while another person is speaking

You have to wait until the end 

Imagine Speaker 1 is speaking  and then in the middle of that 

the second speaker starts to speak about something entirely different

They will feel upset  perhaps 

and angry at the other speaker for treading on their speaking turn

Also  this helps us understand why people in conversations are always paying attention

If the first speaker is speaking  the second speaker is expected to listen

so that they can come in on cue

If they do not do so  what results is an awkward silence

Such an awkward silence  something that we painfully try to avoid

And why silence sometimes in speeches feels awkward as well

Besides coming in at the appropriate time 

the next speaker is always going to try

and speak about something relevant to what the first speaker has said

This is to prove that they were listening

Can you imagine if you were speaking to your mother on the telephone

and after your mother asked you a question 

and you started to talk about something entirely different

They might be offended that you were not listening to them

And as such  there is a threat upon you

to make sure that you are able to prove

that you are listening to what was said

and that you are able to come in on cue

This threat in conversation is something that is different from public speaking

So how exactly is this different from speech?

As I've already said  speeches themselves are very long

usually ten  twenty  thirty minutes  maybe an hour  sometimes two hours

We are simply not used to that length of time  sitting there and listening

We are used to these conversations in which we take turns

in which we have turns that last  maybe only ten  twenty  thirty seconds

Audiences  as a result  are not expected to talk after the speaker has spoken

So that expectation of having to come in on cue 

or to prove that they were listening 

those expectations are not there

In public speaking  audiences can relax

There is no threat  and there is no way of forcing them to listen

One of the other things that can cause audiences to drift away

for them to not pay any more attention

is if they've become confused  they will definitely stop listening 

They can't stop the speech  raise their hand

interrupt the speaker  and ask for clarification

In a conversation  if you don't understand something that someone is saying

you can easily ask for "oh  what did you mean by this?"

That clarification is extremely important in making sure you understand

and then continuing the conversation 

However  in a speech  if someone is listening 

but then they don't understand what you say

they may continue to think about that one moment

And as that time passes 

whether it'd be ten  thirty seconds  or even a minute

When they come back to listening to you 

they would have fallen further behind in your speech 

And as a result 

they won't know where you are or what you're talking about

At that point  people will drift away and stop paying attention

Sometimes  it's the preparation of the presentation itself

that is designed in a way that does not help the audience

Sometimes  the audience is just not interested in the topic

and that could be an issue 

because they can't change the topic like they could in a conversation

So if you look at private speaking in which

there is a constant communication  turns  shorter length

all of these elements make it much much easier

for people in conversations to pay attention

The threat is there  and people respect that threat

The rules of society and politeness demand it

In public speaking  the threat is no longer there

and very often we find

that audiences would easily drift away and stop paying attention

simply because there is no reason 

there is no threat that will stop them from doing so

This is a difference between public and private speaking

and these are just some of the hurdles that we face

when we are trying to keep an audience interested

in what we have to say

Next time we will begin to discuss tools that we can use 

such as eye contact

in order to keep audiences engaged and listening

Thank you  I hope you have enjoyed this lesson 

The Difference between Private and Public Speaking


                    The Difference between Private and Public Speaking

 

      private

[英]['praɪvət][美][ˈpraɪvɪt] 

adj.私有的,私人的; 秘密的; 内心的; 平民的,无官职的,士兵的; 

n.列兵,士兵

复数:privates 

 

例句:

1. Private offices are an expensive addiction.

    私人办公空间是项花费很高的支出。

2. There's a thing called the private cloud, behind the firewall.

    在防火墙后面还有私有云。

3. Often, this information is private.

    很多时候这些信息是私人的。

4. France welcomes private muslim schools.

    法国欢迎私立的穆斯林学校。

5. The private investigator called herself ruth.

    这个私家侦探名自称露丝。

Conclusion

This lesson goes through the difference in the way we speak normally in conversation as opposed to when we speak in front of an audience. It explains how these two formats differ and how we can start to improve simply by understanding these differences.

The main content

I mentioned that public speaking is different from private speaking

Today we're going to discuss what I mean when I say that

Consider first what happens when a speaker makes a speech

Sometimes you will see the audience begin to drift away

or become sleepy  fall asleep or even just stop paying attention

Now think about conversations that you've had with your friends

When it's one on one  neither of you drift away 

neither of you begin to not pay attention to what the other is saying

And both of you continue to talk in the conversation until it's completed

What's the difference?

You might say length for starters

A speech will be going on for maybe ten  twenty  thirty minutes 

and you'll have to listen to that speech

for however long it's going to be

You might consider the number of people

Within the audience  there could be over a hundred people;

whereas in a conversation  it may only have two people or three people

The audience has so many more people

and you cannot simply talk to each one individually

you have to speak to them as a group

There are certain rules that apply to a conversation

that aid us in this difference

There are social rules that we see

when we're talking about politeness and just the ways the social queues work

For example  we have two speakers  One and Two

When one person begins speaking  he will speak for a length of time 

and then stop

When that person stops  the second speaker will begin to speak as well

and then end when they have finished with what they're speaking about

This continues in a conversation

until it is finished

Taking turns within a conversation is part of being polite 

is part of private speaking 

What it means to speak privately with a friend

This idea of taking turns also allows for the ideas of interruptions

It's impolite for one person to speak while another person is speaking

You have to wait until the end 

Imagine Speaker 1 is speaking  and then in the middle of that 

the second speaker starts to speak about something entirely different

They will feel upset  perhaps 

and angry at the other speaker for treading on their speaking turn

Also  this helps us understand why people in conversations are always paying attention

If the first speaker is speaking  the second speaker is expected to listen

so that they can come in on cue

If they do not do so  what results is an awkward silence

Such an awkward silence  something that we painfully try to avoid

And why silence sometimes in speeches feels awkward as well

Besides coming in at the appropriate time 

the next speaker is always going to try

and speak about something relevant to what the first speaker has said

This is to prove that they were listening

Can you imagine if you were speaking to your mother on the telephone

and after your mother asked you a question 

and you started to talk about something entirely different

They might be offended that you were not listening to them

And as such  there is a threat upon you

to make sure that you are able to prove

that you are listening to what was said

and that you are able to come in on cue

This threat in conversation is something that is different from public speaking

So how exactly is this different from speech?

As I've already said  speeches themselves are very long

usually ten  twenty  thirty minutes  maybe an hour  sometimes two hours

We are simply not used to that length of time  sitting there and listening

We are used to these conversations in which we take turns

in which we have turns that last  maybe only ten  twenty  thirty seconds

Audiences  as a result  are not expected to talk after the speaker has spoken

So that expectation of having to come in on cue 

or to prove that they were listening 

those expectations are not there

In public speaking  audiences can relax

There is no threat  and there is no way of forcing them to listen

One of the other things that can cause audiences to drift away

for them to not pay any more attention

is if they've become confused  they will definitely stop listening 

They can't stop the speech  raise their hand

interrupt the speaker  and ask for clarification

In a conversation  if you don't understand something that someone is saying

you can easily ask for "oh  what did you mean by this?"

That clarification is extremely important in making sure you understand

and then continuing the conversation 

However  in a speech  if someone is listening 

but then they don't understand what you say

they may continue to think about that one moment

And as that time passes 

whether it'd be ten  thirty seconds  or even a minute

When they come back to listening to you 

they would have fallen further behind in your speech 

And as a result 

they won't know where you are or what you're talking about

At that point  people will drift away and stop paying attention

Sometimes  it's the preparation of the presentation itself

that is designed in a way that does not help the audience

Sometimes  the audience is just not interested in the topic

and that could be an issue 

because they can't change the topic like they could in a conversation

So if you look at private speaking in which

there is a constant communication  turns  shorter length

all of these elements make it much much easier

for people in conversations to pay attention

The threat is there  and people respect that threat

The rules of society and politeness demand it

In public speaking  the threat is no longer there

and very often we find

that audiences would easily drift away and stop paying attention

simply because there is no reason 

there is no threat that will stop them from doing so

This is a difference between public and private speaking

and these are just some of the hurdles that we face

when we are trying to keep an audience interested

in what we have to say

Next time we will begin to discuss tools that we can use 

such as eye contact

in order to keep audiences engaged and listening

Thank you  I hope you have enjoyed this lesson 

The Difference between Private and Public Speaking