Visual Aid and PPT Restraint



The main content

 and today we’re going to discuss

visual aids and power point presentations

or as I will be referring to them  PPTs

The first thing to recognize is

that a great majority of speeches and presentations

in the modern world have visual aids  

Most often it is a PPT as the technology is easy to use  

In some of the videos of this series

I have been using them myself  

It is an accepted practice in the speaking world

But we have to ask ourselves

are PPTs actually aids for the audience

or are they a crutch for the speaker

Think about what happens when a PPT comes on a screen  

The audience’s eyes shift over to whatever comes up  

The screen is like a magnet for our eyes  

When we are fighting for the audience’s attention

and trying to make eye contact

and an emotional connection 

why are we putting up something

that drags our audience’s attention

away from us as public speakers

Think about any presentation

you have sat through that had a PPT  

Was it enjoyable  

Did you connect with the speaker

or were you reading the whole time  

Too often speakers build PPTs that are word driven  

The audience ends up reading the PPT

and not listening to the speaker  

Too often the PPT simply becomes a crutch for the speaker  

Instead of designing a speech 

they put all their notes on the PPT

and read it off to the audience 

An audience doesn’t want to simply listen to you read  

You must be dynamic and try to make a connection  

SO why do people still use them  

There is an ease and convenience to using them  

It is easy to do

and it makes it look as though you are prepared  

There’s also a sense that

there is a professional aspect to this  

Often people are taught that

they should have a certain PPT a certain way

in order to peer professional 

There are even companies

that are hired just to make “professional” PPTs for people

One of the other reasons is that

PPTs create “a freedom from notes”

but really since the notes are simply up on the screen

instead of the paper  you are not really free

Speakers have simply stopped looking down at their notes

and are instead looking over at the screen  

This is not an improvement because tone still suffers

and the audience settles into reading

and not actually listening to the speaker

So what do we do  Never use PPTs again  No  

PPTs can still be useful if approached correctly  

Visual aids should help the audience to understand

not help the speaker to speak  

The best visual aids are often actual visuals

like pictures or graphs  

Something like this will help the audience

 understand a more complicated point 

These are actual visual aids

Now having words on a PPT is fine

as long they are used to explain or flesh out a speech  

They should not be too word heavy

and should not overwhelm the audience with information  

Let’s take a look at one of our slides from the last lesson 
 
Here’s the slide on rhetorical questions  

This slide gives us a quick heading and two examples  

Since this lesson is on the structure of words and sentences 

these examples provide the audience a visual of the examples

so that they can look at them several times

rather than simply listening to me say the example once  

This helps them to understand the examples better

In this case I want the audience

to be able to see how the example is written out  

I am trying to show you how to write a speech after all

Now notice as well that I do not turn and read the slide  

Instead I point at the relevant example

and I turn back to the audience

and I talk to them with my eyes on them  

I do not have all of the information here on the slide  

Instead the audience gets a small piece of information

and I continue to speak about it directly to the audience  

This is touch  turn and talking  

If you use a PPT  try to implement a similar speaking style

in order to keep your audience’s attention

So that brings us to the end of our discussion on PPTs  

Remember not to have long sentences or too many words 

use visuals like pictures or charts

and always remember not to read off of the PPT

Attempt to keep the eyes of the audience on you

instead of your screen

Now we’ve come to the end of our video series on Public Speaking  

I hope you take into account

both the skills in writing your speech  and in performing it  

Both are critical to your success  

Remember that speaking in public is a skill  

One that we are not as familiar with as speaking in private  

We must practice in order to get better  

Always remember that

Thank you for watching this series  

It’s been a pleasure teaching you 

and I hope the lessons throughout have been

interesting and helpful  

Goodbye and Good Luck

 


                                    Visual Aid and PPT Restraint



The main content

 and today we’re going to discuss

visual aids and power point presentations

or as I will be referring to them  PPTs

The first thing to recognize is

that a great majority of speeches and presentations

in the modern world have visual aids  

Most often it is a PPT as the technology is easy to use  

In some of the videos of this series

I have been using them myself  

It is an accepted practice in the speaking world

But we have to ask ourselves

are PPTs actually aids for the audience

or are they a crutch for the speaker

Think about what happens when a PPT comes on a screen  

The audience’s eyes shift over to whatever comes up  

The screen is like a magnet for our eyes  

When we are fighting for the audience’s attention

and trying to make eye contact

and an emotional connection 

why are we putting up something

that drags our audience’s attention

away from us as public speakers

Think about any presentation

you have sat through that had a PPT  

Was it enjoyable  

Did you connect with the speaker

or were you reading the whole time  

Too often speakers build PPTs that are word driven  

The audience ends up reading the PPT

and not listening to the speaker  

Too often the PPT simply becomes a crutch for the speaker  

Instead of designing a speech 

they put all their notes on the PPT

and read it off to the audience 

An audience doesn’t want to simply listen to you read  

You must be dynamic and try to make a connection  

SO why do people still use them  

There is an ease and convenience to using them  

It is easy to do

and it makes it look as though you are prepared  

There’s also a sense that

there is a professional aspect to this  

Often people are taught that

they should have a certain PPT a certain way

in order to peer professional 

There are even companies

that are hired just to make “professional” PPTs for people

One of the other reasons is that

PPTs create “a freedom from notes”

but really since the notes are simply up on the screen

instead of the paper  you are not really free

Speakers have simply stopped looking down at their notes

and are instead looking over at the screen  

This is not an improvement because tone still suffers

and the audience settles into reading

and not actually listening to the speaker

So what do we do  Never use PPTs again  No  

PPTs can still be useful if approached correctly  

Visual aids should help the audience to understand

not help the speaker to speak  

The best visual aids are often actual visuals

like pictures or graphs  

Something like this will help the audience

 understand a more complicated point 

These are actual visual aids

Now having words on a PPT is fine

as long they are used to explain or flesh out a speech  

They should not be too word heavy

and should not overwhelm the audience with information  

Let’s take a look at one of our slides from the last lesson 
 
Here’s the slide on rhetorical questions  

This slide gives us a quick heading and two examples  

Since this lesson is on the structure of words and sentences 

these examples provide the audience a visual of the examples

so that they can look at them several times

rather than simply listening to me say the example once  

This helps them to understand the examples better

In this case I want the audience

to be able to see how the example is written out  

I am trying to show you how to write a speech after all

Now notice as well that I do not turn and read the slide  

Instead I point at the relevant example

and I turn back to the audience

and I talk to them with my eyes on them  

I do not have all of the information here on the slide  

Instead the audience gets a small piece of information

and I continue to speak about it directly to the audience  

This is touch  turn and talking  

If you use a PPT  try to implement a similar speaking style

in order to keep your audience’s attention

So that brings us to the end of our discussion on PPTs  

Remember not to have long sentences or too many words 

use visuals like pictures or charts

and always remember not to read off of the PPT

Attempt to keep the eyes of the audience on you

instead of your screen

Now we’ve come to the end of our video series on Public Speaking  

I hope you take into account

both the skills in writing your speech  and in performing it  

Both are critical to your success  

Remember that speaking in public is a skill  

One that we are not as familiar with as speaking in private  

We must practice in order to get better  

Always remember that

Thank you for watching this series  

It’s been a pleasure teaching you 

and I hope the lessons throughout have been

interesting and helpful  

Goodbye and Good Luck